Photo101: Glass

Succulents are sculptural, low-water plants that come in an almost unending variety of shapes, sizes and colors. These dry-climate jewels are perfectly suited to our area’s Mediterranean climate because they store water in their leaves, stems, or roots.

The mirror hung on the fence bounces the sunlight and reflects another view of the aeonium in bloom.

Mirrior1

Construction Zone

Our living room has been in disarray for a couple of months as we’ve been working on our latest home improvement project: removing our old fireplace, reframing the wall, installing a new fireplace, tiling the surround, and installing new cabinets. While working on this project, we have completely reconfigured our living room and dining room furniture to get it out of the way of the mess and allow room to work. We hope to be done with everything before the end of the year.

The toilet in our master bathroom is currently sitting on its side in the middle of the floor. Also, all of the items that usually reside under our kitchen sink are now out of the cabinet and in the garage.

Lovely, huh?
Lovely, huh?

Although the living room project was planned, the toilet and kitchen sink were a complete surprise. When we returned home after being away for several weeks, we discovered water where it shouldn’t be; first around the toilet, then under the sink… totally independent, totally unexpected, and totally not what we need right now. Although there wasn’t a lot of water, any water where it shouldn’t be can’t be ignored.

It seems like my husband and I have at least one home project in the works almost continually. Sometimes big, sometimes small, but almost always it (or they) becomes a focus in our lives for far too much time. After the living room is done, there are at least two more good-sized projects I can think of waiting in the wings. This doesn’t include the normal house maintenance projects everyone has (our water heater should be replaced, the living room needs repainting, bushes need trimming, etc.).

We claim that we don’t want to keep taking on these projects, yet, for some reason, we do. We say that our idea of a fulfilling retirement includes more focus on fun, travel and hobbies, and less on construction, dust, and upheaval, but the evidence suggests otherwise.

One of the problems is that we (and by “we” I mean my husband) are pretty skilled at do-it-yourself projects. And, because we (my husband) know how to do these things, we like them to be done a certain way. In addition, we (that would be both of us) are relatively frugal and have a hard time justifying paying someone else to do what we can do ourselves.

Upon returning home from our latest trip, we walked into the living room we left. The one wall was still just bare studs; the brown craft paper was still taped to the floor; the furniture was still topsy-turvy. We didn’t expect HGTV to visit our home and finish everything while we were gone, but the contrast of where we just were (on vacation: pure leisure for three weeks) and what was in front of us was striking. It was good to be home – we love our home – but we had a hard time facing the work we still have to do.

We’ve recently talked about our habit of taking on too much and agree that we need to make some changes in our approach to large household projects. We want to be more realistic about what REALLY needs to be done and, if we decide the outcome is worth the effort and expense, be more open to paying someone else to do the work. Then, after receiving a tradesperson’s bid, the (usually shockingly high) estimate needs to be evaluated against the physical and psychological costs of doing the work ourselves. Are we willing to have our retirement filled with days (weeks, months) of labor? How about the little quarrels that often occur when we are tired and stressed? And then, of course, there are the aches and pains we most likely will suffer because we are no longer 30… or 40.

When we take everything into consideration as we compare one cost to the other, I expect that often the value of freeing up our time will be worth the expense.

Photo101: The Perfect Swarm

Today’s theme, “swarm,” was challenging because, once again, I knew my day wouldn’t hold many opportunities to search for a good representational image. Our list of errands included a trip to Costco so I figured, if nothing else, I could get some shots of the swarm of people usually there. Unfortunately, since it’s a weekday, the crowds were light and the usual swarm was merely a smattering.

As we were leaving I saw this group of shopping carts lined up in almost perfect order and figured that I had my shot.

Swarm2

Photo101: Moment

Today’s assignment was to post a picture that captures a “moment” of life. It was suggested that showing movement can help capture the fleeting moment.

This picture was taken a few weeks ago while we were in Hawaii. One moment, this woman was standing on a rocky outcropping, looking down into a cylinder formed of craggy lava with the ocean some 25 – 30 feet below. The next moment she jumped. I barely had time to frame and shoot the picture before she disappeared. Fortunately, she made it into the water safely and soon climbed out to jump again.

Cliff Diver

Photo101: Architecture

I was a little worried about today’s assignment, “Architecture.” I knew that most of my day would be running around with my husband to various home improvement stores (don’t be jealous) and the chance of capturing a compelling image at a Lowes or Home Depot was pretty slim.

Then, at the end of the day, I spied this high-voltage transmission tower and thought it could work. The assignment suggested looking at our image in both color and B/W. The color version was just OK, but when I changed the image to B/W, I think it became much more interesting.

B_W