Awe Creators

Tree-at-ArchesWeb

With today’s thinly veiled political-speak, anytime the term “job creator” is attached to a proposal, I’m pretty sure some billionaire is going to get richer, a corporation will see their profits soar, a politician’s slush fund will grow, and at least one regulation designed to protect the environment or worker rights will be overlooked or trashed. Decisions that promote short-term gains (for a select few) are too often made at the expense of long-term consequences (for all of us).

Fortunately, beginning more than 140 years ago, there were visionaries and influencers willing to stand up to those who wanted to develop and exploit the wilderness. Instead, they proposed that the government act as a protector of vast swatches of unspoiled nature and spectacular beauty. This idea, which began with the establishment of Yellowstone National Park in 1872, has now grown to include over 450 national parks, national monuments, national historical sites, national scenic trails, and other wonders which are protected and preserved for future generations.

I found myself silently thanking these courageous “awe creators” many times during the three-week road trip my husband I just returned from. If these proactive private citizens, government employees (including presidents), and even an industrialist* hadn’t embraced and promoted the concept of long-term preservation, many of our national treasures would be lost to us today.

That’s not to say we all can breathe easy thinking that the national – and state – parks are safe.  Underfunding, inattention, and political and corporate meddling are all very real threats, as are some of the very people the parks are set aside for. Through our taxes, entrance fees and in-park behavior, we all must diligently protect these wonders to ensure they will be around for generations to come.

 

Zion National Park in southern Utah
Zion National Park in southern Utah

Bryce Canyon Nation Park in southern Utah

Bryce Canyon Nation Park in southern Utah

 

 

Arches National Park in eastern Utah

Arches National Park in eastern Utah

 

 

Painted Desert/Petrified National Park in eastern Arizona

Painted Desert/Petrified National Park in eastern Arizona

 

 

Petrified-ForestWeb

Painted Desert/Petrified National Park in eastern Arizona

 

 

Grand Canyon National Park in northern Arizona
Grand Canyon National Park in northern Arizona

 

*Stephen Tyng Mather, conservationist and president of the Thorkildsen-Mather Borax Company promoted the creation of a federal agency to oversee the national parks. He later became the first director of the National Park Service.

MatherWeb
The plaque reads: “He laid the foundation of the national park service, defining and establishing the policies under which its areas shall be developed and conserved unimpaired for future generations. There will never come an end to the good that he has done.”

0 to 5161 in three weeks

Last night, my husband and I arrived back home after being on the road for three weeks.  We took off from Southern California on April 24 with a rough itinerary that included a couple of hard dates but also a lot of flexibility. We had family and calendared events waiting for us in Omaha and later in St. Louis, but, other than that, we were on our own.

A quiet walk among the the red rocks in Capitol Reef National Park
A quiet walk among the the red rocks in Capitol Reef National Park

The 5,161 miles we traveled took us through 14 states and to 11 national parks and monuments, several state parks, and quite a few museums. We had days when there wasn’t a cloud in the sky, days full of ice and snow, and just about every weather pattern in between. We experienced the majesty of nature in the red rocks of Utah and Arizona and the audacity of men whose dreams led them to carve the likenesses of four presidents and an Indian chief on the sides of mountains. We saw a giant depression in the earth where a meteorite landed 50,000 years ago and we enjoyed the kitsch of visiting a giant rocking chair and sleeping in a motel room shaped like a teepee along the route made famous in the 1920s and 1930s.

My husband, best friend, and traveling buddy (I’m fortunate to have all three wrapped in one person) indulged my photographic whims by happily stopping whenever I asked him to. Our tastes are similar enough so that we usually easily agreed on attractions to stop for as well as food and lodging choices, but we are flexible enough so that we could change plans to accommodate each other’s interests.

Today is the one-year anniversary of my retirement. Over the past twelve months we’ve taken two driving trips and two trips that have required getting on a plane. Planes allow us to get to far-off destinations, but there is nothing like a road trip to best explore this country and build a greater understanding of ourselves and others.

As I do on every one of our travels, I kept a journal of our day-to-day activities and adventures. I also jot down inspirations, insights, and possible blog topics as they occur to me. I will share some of these over the next several posts.

Photo101: Double

For today’s word assignment, “double,” I have two images. Both of them are of the two halves of a single fruit.

The first image is of a sliced dragon fruit. The insides were so beautiful, I took a picture before scooping out the flesh to eat.

Dragon1

The second image is of a pomegranate that had split in two on the vine.

Pamogranet2

  

 

Photo101: Edge

Today’s assignment is to “show an edge — a straight line, a narrow ridge, a precipice.”

There are a few edges in this photo (taken at the Volker Eisele Family Estate winery in Napa Valley), including a precipice that the little figure seems to be considering.

There was absolutely no edge to the wine though; it was smooth and wonderful.

 

 

Photo101: Glass

Succulents are sculptural, low-water plants that come in an almost unending variety of shapes, sizes and colors. These dry-climate jewels are perfectly suited to our area’s Mediterranean climate because they store water in their leaves, stems, or roots.

The mirror hung on the fence bounces the sunlight and reflects another view of the aeonium in bloom.

Mirrior1

Photo101: The Perfect Swarm

Today’s theme, “swarm,” was challenging because, once again, I knew my day wouldn’t hold many opportunities to search for a good representational image. Our list of errands included a trip to Costco so I figured, if nothing else, I could get some shots of the swarm of people usually there. Unfortunately, since it’s a weekday, the crowds were light and the usual swarm was merely a smattering.

As we were leaving I saw this group of shopping carts lined up in almost perfect order and figured that I had my shot.

Swarm2

Photo101: Moment

Today’s assignment was to post a picture that captures a “moment” of life. It was suggested that showing movement can help capture the fleeting moment.

This picture was taken a few weeks ago while we were in Hawaii. One moment, this woman was standing on a rocky outcropping, looking down into a cylinder formed of craggy lava with the ocean some 25 – 30 feet below. The next moment she jumped. I barely had time to frame and shoot the picture before she disappeared. Fortunately, she made it into the water safely and soon climbed out to jump again.

Cliff Diver

Photo101: Architecture

I was a little worried about today’s assignment, “Architecture.” I knew that most of my day would be running around with my husband to various home improvement stores (don’t be jealous) and the chance of capturing a compelling image at a Lowes or Home Depot was pretty slim.

Then, at the end of the day, I spied this high-voltage transmission tower and thought it could work. The assignment suggested looking at our image in both color and B/W. The color version was just OK, but when I changed the image to B/W, I think it became much more interesting.

B_W